• Stable nuclide - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stable_nuclide Definition of stability, and naturally occurring nuclides. Most naturally occurring nuclides are stable (about 252; see list at the end of this article), and about 34 more (total of 286) are known to be radioactive with sufficiently long half-lives (also known) to occur primordially. If the half-life of a nuclide is comparable to, or greater than, the Earth's age (4.5 billion years), a ...
  • Stable Nuclides - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics

    www.sciencedirect.com/topics/engineering/stable-nuclides Stable nuclide 205 Ti is formed after several additional decays. When 237 Np decays it emits moderately high-energy alpha particles, low-energy gamma rays, and low-energy electrons. The total particle and photon spectrum is complex because of the complex decay scheme of 237 Np.
  • Stable nuclide - Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core

    infogalactic.com/info/Stable_nuclide Definition of stability, and naturally occurring nuclides. Most naturally occurring nuclides are stable (about 254; see list at the end of this article); and about 34 more (total of 288) are known radioactives with sufficiently long half-lives (also known) to occur primordially. If the half-life of a nuclide is comparable to, or greater than, the Earth's age (4.5 billion years), a significant ...
  • Stable nuclide — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org/en/Stable_nuclide Stable nuclides are nuclides that are not radioactive and so (unlike radionuclides) do not spontaneously undergo radioactive decay. When such nuclides are referred to in relation to specific elements, they are usually termed stable isotopes.
  • Why is S-32 a stable nuclide? | Study.com

    study.com/academy/answer/why-is-s-32-a-stable-nuclide.html Sulfur-32, also written as S-32 is a stable nuclide because it has an equal number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus of the atom. This is not...
  • Nuclide - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclide A nuclide (or nucleide, from nucleus, also known as nuclear species) is an atomic species characterized by the specific constitution of its nucleus, i.e., by its number of protons, Z, its number of neutrons, N, and its nuclear energy state.. The word nuclide was proposed by Truman P. Kohman in 1947. Kohman originally suggested nuclide as referring to a "species of atom characterized by the ...
  • nuclear physics - What is the most stable nuclide of an ...

    physics.stackexchange.com/.../what-is-the-most-stable-nuclide-of-an-isobar What is the most stable nuclide of an isobar? Ask Question Asked 6 years, 6 months ago. Active 5 years, 11 months ago. Viewed 4k times 6. 4 $\begingroup$ From the semi ...
  • 20.1: Nuclear Stability and Radioactive Decay - Chemistry ...

    chem.libretexts.org/.../20.1%3A_Nuclear_Stability_and_Radioactive_Decay Based on the neutron-to-proton ratio and the value of Z, predict the type of nuclear decay reaction that will produce a more stable nuclide. Solution. This nuclide has a neutron-to-proton ratio of only 1.05, which is much less than the requirement for stability for an element with an atomic number in this range.
  • Table of nuclides - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_nuclides A table or chart of nuclides is a two-dimensional graph of isotopes of the elements, in which one axis represents the number of neutrons (symbol N) and the other represents the number of protons (atomic number, symbol Z) in the atomic nucleus.Each point plotted on the graph thus represents a nuclide of a known or hypothetical chemical element.This system of ordering nuclides can offer a ...
  • What is an unstable nuclide? - Answers

    www.answers.com/Q/What_is_an_unstable_nuclide A stable nuclide is not radioactive and don't disintegrate. What does nuclide mean? A nuclide is a nucleus with a particular combination of protons and neutrons.