• Oxidizing agent - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxidizing_agent In chemistry, an oxidising agent (oxidant, oxidizer) is a substance that has the ability to oxidize other substances — in other words to accept their electrons.Common oxidizing agents are oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and the halogens.. In one sense, an oxidizing agent is a chemical species that undergoes a chemical reaction in which it gains one or more electrons.
  • Oxidizing Agent - Definition, Properties, Examples ...

    byjus.com/chemistry/oxidizing-agent An oxidizing agent (often referred to as an oxidizer or an oxidant) is a chemical species that tends to oxidize other substances, i.e. cause an increase in the oxidation state of the substance by making it lose electrons. Common examples of oxidizing agents include halogens ...
  • Oxidizing Agent Definition and Examples - ThoughtCo

    www.thoughtco.com/definition-of-oxidizing-agent-605459 An oxidizing agent is a reactant that removes electrons from other reactants during a redox reaction. The oxidizing agent typically takes these electrons for itself, thus gaining electrons and being reduced. An oxidizing agent is thus an electron acceptor.
  • Oxidizing Agent: Definition & Examples - Video & Lesson ...

    study.com/academy/lesson/oxidizing-agent-definition-examples-quiz.html This diagram shows that the oxidizing agent gains electrons from another substance, which is the reducing agent. When an oxidizing agent gains electrons, it gets reduced, and, as a result ...
  • Oxidizing agent - sciencedaily.com

    www.sciencedaily.com/terms/oxidizing_agent.htm An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidizer or oxidant) is referred to as a chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or a substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction.
  • Oxidizing_agent

    www.chemeurope.com/en/encyclopedia/Oxidizing_agent.html An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) can be defined as either: . a chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms, or ; a substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction ; The former definition is not applicable to what most people read about, but it is the sense in which most organic chemists use the term. In both cases, the oxidizing agent becomes ...
  • Oxidizing and Reducing Agents - Chemistry LibreTexts

    chem.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/.../Oxidizing_and_Reducing_Agents An oxidizing agent, or oxidant, gains electrons and is reduced in a chemical reaction. Also known as the electron acceptor, the oxidizing agent is normally in one of its higher possible oxidation states because it will gain electrons and be reduced. Examples of oxidizing agents include halogens, potassium nitrate, and nitric acid.
  • Oxidizing and Reducing Agents - Purdue University

    chemed.chem.purdue.edu/genchem/topicreview/bp/ch19/oxred_3.php The permanganate ion removes electrons from oxalic acid molecules and thereby oxidizes the oxalic acid. Thus, the MnO 4-ion acts as an oxidizing agent in this reaction. Oxalic acid, on the other hand, is a reducing agent in this reaction. By giving up electrons, it reduces the MnO 4-ion to Mn 2+.. Atoms, ions, and molecules that have an unusually large affinity for electrons tend to be good ...
  • Redox - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxidizing That is, the oxidant (oxidizing agent) removes electrons from another substance, and is thus itself reduced. And, because it "accepts" electrons, the oxidizing agent is also called an electron acceptor. Oxygen is the quintessential oxidizer. Oxidants are usually chemical substances with elements in high oxidation states (e.g., H 2 O 2, MnO ...
  • Oxidizing and reducing agents (video) | Khan Academy

    www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/.../oxidizing-and-reducing-agents-1 Chlorine is the oxidizing agent. And so this is what students find confusing sometimes, because sodium is itself being oxidized, but it is actually the reducing agent. And chlorine itself is being reduced, but it is actually the oxidizing agent. But when you think about it by thinking about what happened with those electrons, those are the ...