• Electron - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron The electron is a subatomic particle, symbol e − or β −, whose electric charge is negative one elementary charge. Electrons belong to the first generation of the lepton particle family, and are generally thought to be elementary particles because they have no known components or substructure. The electron has a mass that is approximately 1/1836 that of the proton.
  • Electron | Build cross-platform desktop apps with ...

    www.electronjs.org Electron Fiddle lets you create and play with small Electron experiments. It greets you with a quick-start template after opening – change a few things, choose the version of Electron you want to run it with, and play around. Then, save your Fiddle either as a GitHub Gist or to a local folder. Once pushed to GitHub, anyone can quickly try ...
  • electron | Definition, Mass, & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/science/electron Electron, lightest stable subatomic particle known. It carries a negative charge of 1.6 x 10^-19 coulomb, which is considered the basic unit of electric charge. The electron was discovered in 1897 by the English physicist J.J. Thomson during investigations of cathode rays.
  • Electron | Definition of Electron by Merriam-Webster

    www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/electron Electron definition is - an elementary particle consisting of a charge of negative electricity equal to about 1.602 × 10—19 coulomb and having a mass when at rest of about 9.109 × 10—31 kilogram or about 1/1836 that of a proton.
  • Electron - definition of electron by The Free Dictionary

    www.thefreedictionary.com/electron e·lec·tron (ĭ-lĕk′trŏn′) n. Abbr. e A stable elementary particle in the lepton class having a negative electric charge of 1 elementary unit (about 1.602 × 10-19 coulombs) and a mass of about 9.11 × 10-28 grams. Electrons are found in shells orbiting the nuclei of atoms and can also move freely through space as cathode rays in a cathode-ray ...
  • Electron - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron An electron is a very small piece of matter and energy.Its symbol is e −.It was discovered by J. J.Thomson in 1897. The electron is a subatomic particle.It is believed to be an elementary particle because it cannot be broken down into anything smaller. It is negatively charged, and may move almost at the speed of light.. Electrons take part in gravitational, electromagnetic and weak ...
  • Electron Definition in Science - ThoughtCo

    www.thoughtco.com/definition-of-electron-chemistry-604447 An electron is a stable negatively charged component of an atom.Electrons exist outside of and surrounding the atom nucleus. Each electron carries one unit of negative charge (1.602 x 10-19 coulomb) and has a small mass as compared with that of a neutron or proton.Electrons are much less massive than protons or neutrons. The mass of an electron is 9.10938 x 10-31 kg.
  • Electron (software framework) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_(software_framework) Electron (formerly known as Atom Shell) is an open-source software framework developed and maintained by GitHub. It allows for the development of desktop GUI applications using web technologies: it combines the Chromium rendering engine and the Node.js runtime. Electron is the main GUI framework behind several notable open-source projects including Atom, GitHub Desktop, Light Table, Visual ...
  • GitHub - electron/electron: Build cross-platform desktop ...

    github.com/electron/electron The --save-exact flag is recommended for Electron prior to version 2, as it does not follow semantic versioning. As of version 2.0.0, Electron follows semver, so you don't need --save-exact flag. For info on how to manage Electron versions in your apps, see Electron versioning. For more installation options and troubleshooting tips, see installation. ...
  • How to Find the Number of Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons

    www.wikihow.com/Find-the-Number-of-Protons,-Neutrons,-and-Electrons Because an electron has a negative charge, when you remove electrons, the ion becomes positive. When you add more electrons, the ion becomes negative. For example, N 3-has a -3 charge while Ca 2+ has a +2 charge. Keep in mind that you do not have to do this calculation if there is no superscripted ion number following the element.