• Chinese postal romanization - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_postal_romanization Postal romanization was a system of transliterating Chinese place names developed by postal authorities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. For many cities, the postal romanization was the most common English-language form of the city's name from the 1890s until the 1980s, when it was replaced by pinyin.. In 1892, Herbert Giles created a romanization system called Nanking syllabary.
  • Chinese postal romanization - Simple English Wikipedia ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_postal_romanization Chinese postal romanization was the old way of spelling Chinese place names in the Roman alphabet until the 1980s, when Hanyu Pinyin became the standard way for writing Chinese in the Roman alphabet worldwide. While mainland China uses only Hanyu Pinyin for almost all Chinese place names, Taiwan still uses Chinese postal romanization to spell their cities' names, like Taipei, Taichung, and ...
  • Chinese postal romanization - WikiMili, The Free Encyclopedia

    wikimili.com/en/Chinese_postal_romanization Postal romanization was a system of transliterating Chinese place names developed by the Imperial Post Office of China in the early 1900s. The system was in common use until the 1980s, when it was largely replaced by Hanyu Pinyin.
  • Chinese postal romanization - Infogalactic: the planetary ...

    infogalactic.com/info/Chinese_postal_romanization Postal romanization was a system of transliterating Chinese place names developed by the Imperial Post Office in the early 1900s. The system was in common use until the 1980s. For major cities and other places that already had widely accepted European names, traditional spellings were retained. With regard to other place names, the post office revised policy several times.
  • Chinese postal romanization | Project Gutenberg Self ...

    www.self.gutenberg.org/articles/eng/Chinese_postal_romanization Chinese postal map romanization (Chinese: 郵政式拼音; pinyin: Yóuzhèngshì Pīnyīn; Wade–Giles: Yu 2-cheng 4-shih 4 P'in 1-yin 1) was the system of romanization of Chinese place names which came into use in the late Qing dynasty and was officially sanctioned by the Imperial Postal Joint-Session Conference (帝國郵電聯席會議) held in Shanghai in the spring of 1906.
  • Chinese postal romanization - hyperleap.com

    hyperleap.com/topic/Chinese_postal_romanization Chinese postal romanization. postal alternately postal romanization formerly formerly romanized alternately romanized formerly known romanized alternatively alternatively romanized. Postal romanization was a system of transliterating Chinese place names developed by the Imperial Post Office of China in the early 1900s.wikipedia.
  • Making Chinese Roman: Main Systems for Romanizing Mandarin ...

    www.chinese-outpost.com/language/.../mandarin-chinese-romanization-systems.asp Another system from long ago still making occasional appearance is the Chinese Postal Romanization system, which was based largely on German spelling approaches to pronunication. The name you'll see most often from this system is Tsing Tao, the beer, named for the place it's made, Tsing Tao, the island (Qingdao in pinyin spelling).
  • Chinese Romanization Converter (Zhuyin/Bopomofo,pinyin ...

    chinese.gratis/tools/zhuyin Chinese Romanization Converter . This tool allows you to convert text from a Chinese romanization system (phonetic). Zhuyin (Bopomofo) together with a virtual keyboard online.
  • Chinese Stamps for sale | eBay

    www.ebay.com/b/Chinese-Stamps/68114/bn_2309679 What is Chinese postal romanization? Post offices used to have a specific method of writing names of cities in China in Roman letters. International first day covers usually feature these names, which have become valued by people who collect Chinese philatelic releases.
  • The Wade-Giles romanization system for Chinese

    www.chinasage.info/wade-giles.htm The Great Wall of China China The iconic vision of the Great Wall snaking its way up mountainsides is known the world over. One of China's great accomplishments that is genuinely awe-inspiring is the Great Wall. The true story behind the wall is more interesting than the widespread myths.